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Grammar Search
"pulastya" has 1 results
pulastya: masculine vocative singular stem: pulastya
Monier-Williams Search
6 results for pulastya
Devanagari
BrahmiEXPERIMENTAL
pulastyam. Name of an ancient ṛṣi- (one of the mind-born sons of brahmā-;also enumerated among the prajā-pati-s and seven sages, and described as a lawgiver) etc. () View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
pulastyam. Name of śiva- View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
pulastyasiddhāntam. Name of work View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
pulastyasmṛtif. Name of work View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
laghupulastyam. the shorter pulastya- View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
sanatkumārapulastyasaṃvādam. Name of work View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
Apte Search
3 results
agasti अगस्ति [विन्ध्याख्यं अगं अस्यति; अस्-क्तिच् शकन्ध्वादि˚, Uṇ.4. 179, or अगं विन्ध्याचलं स्त्यायति _x001F_+स्तभ्नाति, स्त्यै-क; or अगः कुम्भः तत्र स्त्यानः संहतः इत्यगस्त्यः] 1 'Pitcher-born,' N. of a celebrated Ṛiṣi or sage. -2 N. of the star Canopus, of which Agastya is the regent. -3 N. of a plant (बकवृक्ष) Sesbana (or Ӕschynomene) Grandiflora [Mar. रुईमंदार]. [The sage Agastya is a very reputed personage in Hindu mythology. In the Ṛigveda he and Vasiṣṭha are said to be the off-springs of Mitra and Varuṇa, whose seed fell from them at the sight of the lovely nymph Urvaśī at a sacrificial session. Part of the seed fell into a jar and part into water; from the former arose Agastya, who is, therefore, called Kumbhayoni, Kumbhajanman, Ghaṭodbhava, Kalaśayoni &c; from the latter Vasiṣṭha. From his parentage Agastya is also called Maitrāvaruṇi, Aurvaśeya, and, as he was very small when he was born, he is also called Mānya. He is represented to have humbled the Vindhya mountains by making them prostrate themselves before him when they tried to rise higher and higher till they wellnigh occupied the sun's disc and obstructed his path. See Vindhya. (This fable is supposed by some, to typify the progress of the Āryas towards the south in their conquest and civilization of India, the humbling of the mountain standing meta-phorically for the removal of physical obstacles in their way). He is also known by the names of Pītābdhi, Samudra-chuluka &c.; from another fable according to which he drank up the ocean because it had offended him and because he wished to help Indra and the gods in their wars with a class of demons called Kāleyas who had hid themselves in the waters and oppressed the three worlds in various ways. His wife was Lopāmudrā. She was also called Kauṣītakī and Varapradā. She bore him two sons, Dṛḍhāsya and Dṛḍhāsyu. In the Rāmāyaṇa Agastya plays a distinguished part. He dwelt in a hermitage on mount Kunjara to the south of the Vindhya and was chief of the hermits of the south. He kept under control the evil spirits who infested the south and a legend relates how he once ate up a Rākṣasa named Vātāpi, who had assumed the form of a ram, and destroyed by a flash of his eye the Rākṣasa's brother who attempted to avenge him. In the course of his wandering Rāma with his wife and brother came to the hermitge of Agastya who received him with the greatest kindness and became his friend, adviser and protector. He gave Rāma the bow of Viṣṇu and accompanied him to Ayodhyā when he was restored to his kingdom after his exile of 14 years. The superhuman power which the sage possessed, is also represented by another legend, according to which he turned king Nahuṣa into a serpent and afterwards restored him to his proper form. In the south he is usually regarded as the first teacher of science and literature to the primitive Dravidian tribes, and his era is placed by Dr. Caldwell in the 7th or 6th century B.C. The Purāṇas represent Agastya as the son of Pulastya (the sage from whom the Rākṣsas sprang) and Havirbhuvā the daughter of Kardama. Several 'hymn-seers' are mentioned in his family, such as his two sons, Indra-bāhu, Mayobhuva and Mahendra, also others who served to perpetuate the family. The sage is represented as a great philosopher, benevolent and kind-hearted, unsurpassed in the science of archery and to have taken a principal part in the colonization of the south; निर्जितासि मया भद्रे शत्रुहस्तादमर्षिणा । अगस्त्येन दुराधर्षा मुनिना दक्षिणेव _x001F_.दिक् ॥ Rām; अगस्त्याचरितामाशाम् R.4.44; cf. also; अगस्त्यो दक्षिणामाशामाश्रित्य नभसिः स्थितः । वरुणस्यात्मजो योगी विन्ध्यवातापिमर्दनः ॥ and R.6.61; Mv.7.14.] अगस्तितुल्या हि घृताब्धिशोषणे । Udbhaṭa.
rāvaṇa रावण a. [रु-णिच् ल्यु] Crying, screaming, roaring, bewailing; इत्युक्त्वा परुषं वाक्यं रावणः शत्रुरावणः Rām.3.56. 26 (com. शत्रून् रावयति क्रोशयति शत्ररावणः). -णः N. of a celebrated demon, king of Laṅkā and the chief of the Rākṣhasas; स रावणो नाम निकामभीषणं बभूव रक्षः क्षतरक्षणं दिवः Śi.1.48. [He was the son of Viśravas by Keśinī or Kaikaśī and so half-brother of Kuber. He is called Paulastya as being a grandson of the sage Pulastya. Laṅkā was originally occupied by Kubera, but Rāvaṇa ousted him from it and made it his own capital. He had ten heads (and hence his names Daśagrīva, Daśa- vadana &c.) and twenty arms, and according to some, four legs (cf. R.12.88 and Malli.). He is represented to have practised the most austere penance for ten thousand years in order to propitiate the god Brahman, and to have offered one head at the end of each one thousand years. Thus he offered nine of his heads and was going to offer the tenth when the God was pleased and granted him immunity from death by either god or man. On the strength of this boon he grew very tyrannical and oppressed all beings. His power became so great that even the gods are said to have acted as his domestic servants. He conquered almost all the kings of the day, but is said to have been imprisoned by Kārtavīrya for some time when he went to attack his territory. On one occasion he tried to uplift the Kailāsa mountain, but Śiva pressed it down so as to crush his fingers under it. He, therefore, hymned Śiva for one thousand years so loudly that the God gave him the name Rāvaṇa and freed him from his painful position. But though he was so powerful and invincible, the day of retribution drew near. While Rāma who was Viṣṇu descended on earth for the destruction of this very demon was passing his years of exile in the forest, Rāvaṇa carried off his wife Sītā and urged her to become his wife but she persistently refused and remained loyal to her husband. At last Rāma assisted by his monkey-troops invaded Laṅkā, annihilated Rāvaṇa's troops and killed the demon himself. He was a worthy opponent of Rāma, and hence the expression:-- रामरावणयोर्युद्धं रामरावणयोरिव ।]. -णम् 1 The act of screaming. -2 N. of a Muhūrta. -Comp. -अरिः N. of Rāma. -गङ्गा N. of a river in Laṅkā.
viśravas विश्रवस् m. N. of a son of Pulastya, and father of Rāvaṇa, Kumbhakarṇa, Bibhīṣaṇa and Śūrpaṇakhā by his wife Kaikasī and of Kubera by his wife Iḍāviḍā.
Macdonell Search
1 result
pulastya m. N. of an ancient Rishi, mentioned as one of the spiritual sons of Brahman, as one of the Pragâpatis, and as one of the seven Rishis; N. of a star.
Vedabase Search
21 results
pulastya-pulaha-āśramam to the āśrama conducted by such great sages as Pulastya and PulahaSB 5.8.30
pulastya-pulaha-āśramam to the āśrama conducted by such great sages as Pulastya and PulahaSB 5.8.30
pulastya-pulaha-āśramam to the āśrama conducted by such great sages as Pulastya and PulahaSB 5.8.30
pulastya PulastyaSB 4.29.42-44
pulastya the sage PulastyaSB 3.12.24
SB 4.1.36
pulastyaḥ kaśyapaḥ atriḥ ca Pulastya, Kaśyapa and AtriSB 10.84.2-5
pulastyaḥ kaśyapaḥ atriḥ ca Pulastya, Kaśyapa and AtriSB 10.84.2-5
pulastyaḥ kaśyapaḥ atriḥ ca Pulastya, Kaśyapa and AtriSB 10.84.2-5
pulastyaḥ kaśyapaḥ atriḥ ca Pulastya, Kaśyapa and AtriSB 10.84.2-5
pulastyaḥ tumburuḥ Pulastya and TumburuSB 12.11.33
pulastyaḥ tumburuḥ Pulastya and TumburuSB 12.11.33
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
marīciḥ, atri, ańgirasau, pulastyaḥ, pulahaḥ, kratuḥ, bhṛguḥ, vasiṣṭhaḥ, dakṣaḥ names of sons of BrahmāSB 3.12.22
1 result
pulastya noun (masculine) name of an ancient ṣi (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
name of Śiva (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 3218/72933
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