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     Grammar Search "apsaras" has 2 results.
     
apsarās: feminine nominative singular stem: apsaras
apsaras: feminine vocative singular stem: apsaras
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WordReferenceGenderNumberSynonymsDefinition
apsarasaḥFemininePluralnymphs
     Monier-Williams
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5 results for apsaras
     
Devanagari
BrahmiEXPERIMENTAL
अप्सरस्See sub voce, i.e. the word in the Sanskrit order View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
अप्सरस् ās- ([ etc.]) , or ap-sar/ā- ([AV. etc.]), f. (fr. 2. /ap-+ sṛ-),"going in the waters or between the waters of the clouds", a class of female divinities (sometimes called"nymphs";they inhabit the sky, but often visit the earth;they are the wives of the gandharva-s(q.v)and have the faculty of changing their shapes at will;they are fond of the water;one of their number, rambhā-, is said to have been produced at the churning of the ocean). View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
अप्सरस्तीर्थn. a pool in which the āpsarasa-s bathe View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
अनप्सरस्f. unlike an apsaras-, unworthy of an apsaras-. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
देवप्सरस्(v/a--) mfn. serving the gods as a feast or enjoyment View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
     Apte Search  
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apsaras अप्सरस् f. (-राः, रा). [अद्भ्यः सरन्ति उद्गच्छन्ति, सृ-असुन् Uṇ.4.236; cf. Rām. अप्सु निर्मथनादेव रसात्तस्माद्वर- स्त्रियः । उत्पेतुर्मनुजश्रेष्ठ तस्मादप्सरसो$भवन् ॥ A class of female divinities or celestial damsels who reside in the sky and are regarded as the wives of the Gandharvas. They are very fond of bathing, can change their shapes, and are endowed with superhuman power (प्रभाव). They are called स्वर्वेश्याः and are usually described as the servants of Indra, who, when alarmed by the rigorous austerities of some mighty sage, sends down one of them to disturb his penance, and her mission is generally successful; मेनका$प्सरसां श्रेष्ठा महर्षिणां पिता च ते Mb.1.74.75. cf. या तपोविशेषपरिशङ्कितस्य सुकुमारं प्रहरणं महेन्द्रस्य V. 1. They are also said to covet heroes who die gloriously on the battle-field; cf. परस्परेण क्षतयोः प्रहर्त्रोरुत्क्रान्तवाय्वोः समकालमेव । अमर्त्यभावे$पि कयोश्चिदासीदेकाप्सरः प्रार्थितयोर्विवादः ॥ R.7.53. Bāṇa mentions 14 different families of these nymphs (see K.136) The word is usually said to be in pl. (स्त्रियां बहुष्वप्सरसः) but the singular, as also the form अप्सराः, sometimes occurs; नियमविघ्नकारिणी मेनका नाम अप्सराः प्रेषिता Ś.1; एकाप्सरः &c. R.7.53 and see Malli. thereon; अनप्सरेव प्रतिभासि V.1. -2 Direction or the intermediate point of the compass (दिक् च उपदिक् च). -Comp. -तीर्थम् N. of a sacred pool in which the Apsarasas bathe; probably it is the name of a place, see Ś.6. -पतिः lord of the Apsarasas, epithet of Indra. N. of the Gandharva शिखण्डिन्; Av.4.37.7.
anapsaras अनप्सरस् रा f. Not an Apsaras, unworthy of a celestial nymph; अनप्सरेव प्रतिभासि V.2.
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apsaras ap-sarás, ˚rā f. celestial nymph.
anapsaras f. no Apsaras.
     Vedic Index of
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āti an aquatic bird. The Apsarases in the legend of Purūravas and Urvaśī appear to him like Atis, probably swans. The birds appear also in the list of animals in the Aśvamedha (‘ horse sacrifice ’), where Mahīdhara renders them as the later Adi (Turdus ginginianus), and Sāyana quotes a view, according to which the Áti was the Cāsa, or blue jay (Coracias indica).
aukṣagandhi Gandhi (‘ having the smell of bull’s grease ’) appears in the Atharvaveda as the name of an Apsaras, beside other names, of which Guggulū and Naladī clearly indicate plants. This name, therefore, presumably also denotes some sort of fragrant plant. Auksa in the same Samhitā means bull’s grease ’ (from īiksan, ‘ bull ’).
go ‘ox’ or ‘cow.’ These were among the chief sources of wealth to the Vedic Indian, and are repeatedly referred to from the Rigveda onwards. The milk (Ksīra) was either drunk fresh or made into butter (Ghrta) or curds (Dadhi), or was mixed with Soma or used for cooking with grain (Ksīraudana).The cows were milked thrice a day, early (prātar-doha), in the forenoon (Samgava), and in the evening (.sāyam-doha). Thrice a day they were driven out to graze, according to the Taittirīya Brāhmana (prātah, saφgave, say am). The first milking was productive, the last two scanty. According to the Aitareya Brāhmana, among the Bharatas the herds in the evening are in the Gostha, at midday in the Samgavinī. This passage Sāyana expands by saying that the herds go home to the Sālā, or house for animals, at night so far as they consist of animals giving milk, while the others stayed out in the Gostha, or open pasturage ; but both were together in the cattle-shed during the heat of the day. The time before the Samgava, when the cows were grazing freely on the pastureland, was called Svasara. When the cows were out feeding they were separated from the calves, which were, how¬ever, allowed to join them at the Samgava, and sometimes in the evening. While grazing the cattle were under the care of a herdsman (Gopā, Gopāla) armed with a goad, but they were liable to all sorts of dangers, such as being lost, falling into pits, breaking limbs, and being stolen. The marking of the ears of cattle was repeatedly adopted, no doubt, to indicate ownership. Large herds of cattle were well-known, as is shown by the Dānastutis, or ‘ praises of gifts,’ in the Rigveda, even when allowances are made for the exaggeration of priestly gratitude. The importance attached to the possession of cattle is shown by the numerous passages in which the gods are asked to prosper them, and by the repeated prayers for wealth in kine. Hence, too, forays for cattle (Gavisti) were well known; the Bharata host is called the ‘ horde desiring cows ’ (gavyan grāmak) in the Rigveda j and a verbal root gup, ‘ to protect,’ was evolved as early as the Rigveda from the denominative go-pāya, ‘ to guard cows.’ The Vedic poets do not hesitate to compare their songs with the lowing of cows, or to liken the choir of the singing Apsarases to cows. The cattle of the Vedic period were of many colours: red (:rohita), light (śakra), dappled (prśni), even black (krsna). Zimmer sees a reference to cows with blazes on the face in one passage of the Rigveda, but this is uncertain. Oxen were regularly used for ploughing or for drawing wágons (anadvāh), in which case they were, it seems, usually castrated. Cows were not properly used for drawing carts, though they at times did so. The flesh of both cows and bulls was sometimes eaten (Māmsa). Cattle were certainly the objects of individual ownership, and they formed one of the standards of exchange and valuation (see Kraya). The term Go is often applied to express the products of the cow. It frequently means the milk, but rarely the flesh of the animal. In many passages it designates leather used as the material of various objects, as a bowstring, or a sling, or thongs to fasten part of the chariot, or reins,or the lash of a whip. See also Carman, with which Go is sometimes synonymous.
cūrṇa Appears to denote an aromatic powder in the phrase cūrηa-hasta, used of the Apsarases in the Kausītaki Upanisad.
nalada ‘Nard’ (N ardastachys Jatamansi) is a plant mentioned in the Atharvaveda, in the Aitareya and the śāñkhāyana Aranyakas (where it is mentioned as used for a garland), as well as in the Sūtras. In the Atharvaveda the feminine form of the word, Naladī, occurs as the name of an Apsaras, or celestial nymph.
pañcajanāḥ The ‘five peoples,’ are mentioned under various names in Vedic literature. Who are meant by the five is very uncertain. The Aitareya Brāhmana explains the five to be gods, men, Gandharvas and Apsarases, snakes, and the Fathers. Aupamanyava held that the four castes (Varna) and the Nisādas made up the five, and Sāyana is of the same opinion. Yāska thinks that the five are the Gandharvas, fathers, gods, Asuras, and Raksases. No one of these explanations can be regarded as probable. Roth and Geldner think that all the peoples of the earth are meant: just as there are four quarters (Diś), there are peoples at the four quarters (N. E. S. W.), with the Aryan folk in the middle. Zimmer opposes this view on the ground that the inclusion of all peoples in one expression is not in harmony with the distinction so often made between Aryan and Dāsa ; that neither janāsah, ‘ men,’ nor mānusāh, ‘people,’ could be used of non-Aryans; that the Soma is referred to as being among the five tribes; that the five tribes are mentioned as on the Sarasvatī, and that Indra is pāñca- jany a, ‘ belonging to the five peoples.’ Pie concludes that Aryans alone are meant, and in particular the five tribes of the Anus, Druhyus, Yadus, Turvaśas, and Pūrus, who are all mentioned together in one or perhaps two hymns of the Rigveda, and four of whom occur in another hymn. But he admits that the expression might easily be used more generally later. Hopkins has combated Zimmer’s view, but his own opinion rests mainly on his theory that there was no people named Turvaśa, but only a king of the Yadus called Turvaśa, and that theory is not very probable. In the śatapatha Brāhmana and the Aitareya Brāhmana the five peoples are opposed to the Bharatas, and in the former work seven peoples are alluded to.
pilā Occurs once in the Atharvaveda as the name of an Apsaras, being no doubt originally a name of some fragrant plant, like Naladī and Guggulū, two other names of Apsarases given in the same verse.
purūravas Is the name of a hero in a hymn of the Rigveda containing a curious dialogue between him and a nymph, Urvaśī, an Apsaras. He is also mentioned in the śatapatha Brāhmana, where several verses of the Rigvedic dialogue find a setting in a continuous story. In the later literature he is recognized as a king. His name is perhaps intended in one other passage of the Rigveda. It is impossible to say whether he is a mythical figure pure and simple, or really an ancient king. His epithet, Aila, descendant of Idā (a sacrificial goddess), is certainly in favour of the former alternative.
pramandanī Is the name of an Apsaras in the Atharvaveda. Probably the word primarily denoted a certain sweet-scented plant, which seems to be the sense of pra-manda in the Kauáika Sūtra.
bekurā Occurs in the Pañcavimśa Brāhmaṇa, where it may mean ‘ voice ’ or ‘ sound,’ the sense assigned to the word in the Naighaṇtuka. It is, however, possibly, like Bakura, the name of a musical instrument. In the Taittirīya and the Kāthaka4 Samhitās the words Bekuri and Vekuri occur as epithets of Apsarases, or celestial nymphs, meaning, perhaps, ‘melodious’; in the Vājasaneyi Samhitā and the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa6 the variations Bhakuri and Bhākuri are found.
śakuntalā Is the name of an Apsaras who bore Bharata, according to the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa, at Nādapit. Weber doubtfully reads the latter word as Nādapitī, an epithet of śakuntalā.
       Bloomfield Vedic
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apsarasa upa sedur vasiṣṭhāḥ RV.7.33.9d.
apsarasaḥ pari jajñe vasiṣṭhaḥ RV.7.33.12d.
apsarasaḥ sadhamādaṃ madanti AVś.7.109.3a; 14.2.34a. See yā apsarasaḥ etc.
apsarasāṃ gandharvāṇām RV.10.136.6a. See gandharvāṇām apsarasām.
apsarasām anudattānṛṇāni MS.4.14.17d: 245.12. See apsarasāv.
apsarasām ayaṃ smaraḥ AVś.6.130.1b.
apsarasāv anu dattām ṛṇaṃ naḥ (TBṭA. ṛṇāni) AVś.6.118.1d; TB.3.7.12.3d; TA.2.4.1d. See apsarasām anu-.
apsaraso muṣkābhyām TS.5.7.15.1; KSA.13.5.
apsaraso raghaṭo yāś caranti AVP.12.8.5c.
apsaraso vi vo yakṛt AVP.15.18.1a.
apsarassu yo gandhaḥ ApMB.2.7.24a (ApG.5.12.8). See apsarāsu ca yo.
apsarassv api gandharva āsīt KA.1.101Ab. See apsarābhir api, and apsarāsv api.
     Vedabase Search  
48 results
     
apsarasaḥ born of an ApsarāSB 9.20.3
apsarasaḥ inhabitants of ApsarolokaSB 4.20.35-36
apsarasaḥ the angelsSB 3.10.28-29
apsarasaḥ the ApsarāsSB 12.11.47-48
SB 3.24.7
apsarasaḥ the beautiful angels of the Apsarā planetSB 2.10.37-40
apsarasaḥ the celestial dancing girlsSB 8.18.8
apsarasaḥ the inhabitants of ApsarolokaSB 7.4.14
SB 8.5.40
apsarasaḥ the inhabitants of the Apsarā planetSB 4.18.17
apsarasaḥ the residents of ApsarolokaSB 8.8.7
apsarasaḥ the society girls of heavenSB 11.12.3-6
apsarasaḥ ca and the celestial dancing girlsSB 10.12.34
apsarasaḥ ca and the celestial dancing girlsSB 10.12.34
apsarasām and of the heavenly dancing girlsSB 3.20.38
apsarasām and the inhabitants of ApsarolokaSB 7.15.71
apsarasām of angelsSB 6.6.27
apsarasam the celestial woman (Pūrvacitti)SB 5.2.22
apsarasam the heavenly dancing girlSB 5.2.3
apsarasi who belonged to the Apsarā groupSB 9.24.43
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ Gandharvas and ApsarāsSB 5.21.18
gandharva-apsarasaḥ the Gandharvas and ApsarāsSB 10.63.9
gandharva-apsarasaḥ the heavenly musicians and dancing girlsSB 11.6.2-4
kinnara-apsarasaḥ the Kinnaras and ApsarāsSB 11.31.2-3
gandharva-apsarasaḥ the Gandharvas and ApsarāsSB 12.6.15
gandharva-apsarasaḥ the celestial singers and dancing girlsSB 12.8.16
pañca-apsarasam the lake of the five ApsarāsSB 10.79.18
gandharva-apsarasām among the Gandharvas and ApsarāsSB 11.16.33
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ Gandharvas and ApsarāsSB 5.21.18
gandharva-apsarasaḥ the Gandharvas and ApsarāsSB 10.63.9
gandharva-apsarasaḥ the heavenly musicians and dancing girlsSB 11.6.2-4
gandharva-apsarasām among the Gandharvas and ApsarāsSB 11.16.33
gandharva-apsarasaḥ the Gandharvas and ApsarāsSB 12.6.15
gandharva-apsarasaḥ the celestial singers and dancing girlsSB 12.8.16
kinnara-apsarasaḥ the Kinnaras and ApsarāsSB 11.31.2-3
pañca-apsarasam the lake of the five ApsarāsSB 10.79.18
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
gandharva-apsarasaḥ, yakṣāḥ, rakṣaḥ-bhūta-gaṇa-uragāḥ, paśavaḥ, pitaraḥ, siddhāḥ, vidyādhrāḥ, cāraṇāḥ all inhabitants of different planetsSB 2.6.13-16
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apsaras noun (feminine) a class of female divinities (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 1015/72933
     Wordnet Search "apsaras" has 1 results.
     

apsaras

apsarasaḥ, svarveśyāḥ, apsarāḥ   

svarge vasantyaḥ aṅganāḥ।

urvaśyādyāḥ apsarasaḥ santi।

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