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     Grammar Search "vrātya" has 2 results.
     
vrātya: masculine vocative singular stem: vrātya
vrātya: neuter vocative singular stem: vrātya
     Amarakosha Search  
1 result
     
WordReferenceGenderNumberSynonymsDefinition
vrātya2.7.58MasculineSingularsaṃskārahīnaḥ
     Monier-Williams
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17 results for vrātya
     
Devanagari
BrahmiEXPERIMENTAL
vrātyam. a man of the mendicant or vagrant class, a tramp, out-caste, low or vile person (either a man who has lost caste through non-observance of the ten principal saṃskāra-s, or a man of a particular low caste descended from a śūdra- and a kṣatriyā-; according to to some"the illegitimate son of a kṣatriya- who knows the habits and intentions of soldiers";in ,the rājanya-s and even the Brahmans are said to have sprung from the vrātya- who is identified with the Supreme Being, prob. in glorification of religious mendicancy; according to to vrātya-is used in addressing a guest) etc. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyamfn. belonging to the vrata- called mahā-vrata- (q.v) View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyabhāvam. equals -- View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyabruvam. one who calls himself a vrātya- View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyacaraṇan. () the life and practice of a vagrant. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyacaryāf. ( ,) the life and practice of a vagrant. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyadhanan. the property of a vrātya- View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyagaṇam. the vagrant class View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyastomam. Name of particular ekāha-s View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyastomam. (with kratu-) a particular sacrifice (performed to recover the rights forfeited by a delay of the saṃskāra-s) View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyaf. the condition of a vrātya- etc. () . View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyatvan. the condition of a vrātya- etc. () . View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyayājakam. one who sacrifices for a vrātya- View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vrātyayajñam. a kind of sacrifice (see -stoma-). View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
avrātyam. not a vratya- View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
avrātyan. equals a-vraty/a- n. q.v View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
ekavrātyam. the only or supreme vrātya- (q.v) View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
     Apte Search  
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vrātya व्रात्यः [व्रातात् समूहात् च्यवति यत्] 1 A man of the first three classes who has lost his caste owing to the nanperformance of the principal Saṁskāras or purificatory rites (especially investiture with the sacred thread) over him, an outcast; सावित्रीपतिता व्रात्या भवन्त्यार्यविगर्हिताः Ms.2. 39; सौराष्ट्रावन्त्याभीराश्च शूरा अर्बुदमालवाः । व्रात्या द्विजा भविष्यन्ति शूद्रप्राया जनाधिपाः Bhāg.12.1.38; भवत्या हि व्रात्याधमपतित- पाखण्डपरिषत्परित्राणस्नेहः G. L.37. -2 A low or vile person in general; vagrant. -3 A man of a particular inferior tribe (the descendant of a Śūdra father and Kṣatriya mother). -त्या The daughter of an outcast. -Comp. -चर्या the life and practice of a vagrant. -ब्रुवः one who calls himself a Vrātya. -स्तोमः N. of a sacrifice performed to recover the rights forfeited by the nonperformance of the due Saṁskāras.
     Macdonell Search  
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vrātya m. [vrâta] member of a vagrant gang; member of an extra-Brahmani cal association, outcast: â, f. outcast woman; (a)-tâ, f. living as a Vrâtya; -stoma, m. (± kratu) kind of ekâha sacrifice.
     Vedic Index of
     Names and Subjects  
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vrātya Is included in the list of victims at the Puruṣamedha (‘human sacrifice’) in the Yajurveda, where, however, no further explanation of the name is given. Fuller information is furnished by the Atharvaveda, the Pañcavimśa Brāhmaṇa, and the Sūtras, which describe at length a certain rite intended for the use of Vrātyas. According to the Pañcavimśa Brāh­maṇa, there are four different kinds of ‘outcasts’—viz., the hīna, who are merely described as ‘depressed’; those who have become outcasts for some sin (nindita); those who become out­casts at an early age, apparently by living among outcasts; and those old men who, being impotent (śama-nīcamedhra), have gone to live with outcasts. The last three categories are by no means of the same importance as the first. The motive of the fourth is hard to understand: according to Rājārām Rām- krishṇa Bhāgavat,5 they were men who had enfeebled their constitutions by undue intercourse with women in the lands of the outcasts, and returned home in a debilitated state. But this is not stated in the text. It seems probable that the really important Vrātyas were those referred to as Itlna, and that the other classes were only subsidiary. According to Rāj'ārām,® there were two categories of the first class: (a) The depressed (hīna), who were non- Aryan ; and (6) degraded Aryans (gara-gir). This, however, is a mere guess, and devoid of probability. There seems to have been but one class of Vrātyas. That they were non-Aryan is not probable, for it is expressly said7 that, though unconse¬crated, they spoke the tongue of the consecrated: they were thus apparently Aryans. This view is confirmed by the state-ment that ‘they call what is easy of utterance, difficult to utter’: probable they had already a somewhat Prakritic form of speech (cf. Vāc). The Sūtras mention their Arhants (‘saints’) and Yaudhas (‘warriors’), corresponding to the Brahminical Brāhmana and Kṣatriya. Other particulars accord with the view that they were Aryans outside the sphere of Brahmin culture. Thus they are said not to practise agriculture or commerce (an allusion to a nomadic life), nor to observe the rules of Brahmacarya—i.e., the principle regulating the Brahminic order of life. They were also allowed to become members of the Brahminical community by performance of the ritual prescribed, which would hardly be so natural in the case of non-Aryans. Some details are given of the life and dress of the Vrātyas. Their principles were opposed to those of the Brahmins: they beat those unworthy of correction. Their leader (Gṛhapati) or householder wore a turban (Uçṇīçε), carried a whip (Pratoda), a kind of bow (Jyāhroda), was :lothed in a black (krçnaśa) garment and two skins (Ajina), blxk and white (krsna-valaksa), and owned a rough wagon (Vijatha) covered with planks (phalakāstīrna). The others, subordinate to the leader, had garments with fringes of red (valūkāntāni dāmatūsām), two fringes on each, skins folded double (dvisamhitāny ajinūni), and sandals (Upānah). The leader wore also an ornament (Niçka) of silver, which Rājārām converts into a silver coinage. The Vrātyas, on becoming consecrated, were expected to hand over their goods to the priest. Many other details are given in the Sūtras (e.g., that the shoes or sandals were of variegated black hue and pointed), but these are not authenticated by the Pañcavimśa Brāhmaṇa. The locality in which the Vrāiyas lived cannot be stated with certainty, but their nomad life suggests the western tribes beyond the Sarasvatī. But they may equally well have been in the east: this possibility is so far supported by the fact that the Sūtras make the Brahmin receiving the gift of the Vrātya's outfit an inhabitant of Mag’adha. The Atharvaveda does not help, for it treats the Vrātya in so mystical a way that he is represented as being in all the quarters. Indeed, Roth believed that it was here not a case of the Vrātya of the Pañcavimśa Brāhmaṇa at all, but of a glorification of the Vrātya as the type of the pious vagrant or wandering religious mendicant (Parivrājaka). This view is clearly wrong, as the occurrence of the words usnīsa, vipatha, and pratoda shows. It is probable that the 15th Book of the Atharvaveda, which deals with the Vrātya, and is of a mystical character, exalts the converted Vrātya as a type of the perfect Brahmacārin, and, in so far, of the divinity.
     Vedabase Search  
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vrātya-ādyāḥ brāhmaṇas who have fallen from the brahminical standard, and other disqualified menSB 12.1.37
vrātya-ādyāḥ brāhmaṇas who have fallen from the brahminical standard, and other disqualified menSB 12.1.37
     DCS with thanks   
3 results
     
vrātya noun (masculine) a man of a particular low caste descended from a Śūdra and a Kṣatriyā (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
a man of the mendicant or vagrant class (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
a tramp (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
low or vile person (either a man who has lost caste through non-observance of the ten principal Saṃskāras) (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
out-caste (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 8512/72933
vrātyastoma noun (masculine) a particular sacrifice (performed to recover the rights forfeited by a delay of the Saṃskāras) (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
name of particular Ekāhas (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 30418/72933
avrātya noun (neuter) not being a vrātya
Frequency rank 45573/72933








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